Treasures of The Booth Museum - Upper Cretaceous 1

The Hidden Treasures of Sussex Museums » Booth_1 Museaum - Upper Cretaceous 1

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  • <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Ctenothrissa radians Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Found by Charles Potter in the Lewes area in the 19th century this is a rare complete example of this beautiful scaly fish.

  • <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Ctenothrissa radians (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Found by Charles Potter in the Lewes area in the 19th century this is a rare complete example of this beautiful scaly fish.

  • <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Ctenothrissa radians (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Found by Charles Potter in the Lewes area in the 19th century this is a rare complete example of this beautiful scaly fish.

  • <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Ctenothrissa radians (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.

    Found by Charles Potter in the Lewes area in the 19th century this is a rare complete example of this beautiful scaly fish.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Palaeastacus dixoni Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    This splendid Lobster was collected by the notable Brighton worthy Henry Willett and was first published in the scientific press in 1850!.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Palaeastacus dixoni (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    This splendid Lobster was collected by the notable Brighton worthy Henry Willett and was first published in the scientific press in 1850!.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Palaeastacus dixoni (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    This splendid Lobster was collected by the notable Brighton worthy Henry Willett and was first published in the scientific press in 1850!.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Enoploclytia leachii (Pincers) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    These pincers belong to a different type of Lobster than the last specimen.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Enoploclytia leachii (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    These pincers belong to a different type of Lobster than the last specimen.

  • Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    Chalk Lobster: Enoploclytia leachii (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.

    These pincers belong to a different type of Lobster than the last specimen.

  • Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp., Upper Chalk, Kent.

    Chalk Starfish: Metopaster sp., Upper Chalk, Kent.

    This beautiful starfish is one of many types known from the Chalk, though rarely found complete.

  • Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.

    Chalk Starfish: Metopaster sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.

    This beautiful starfish is one of many types known from the Chalk, though rarely found complete.

  • Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.

    Chalk Starfish: Metopaster sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.

    This beautiful starfish is one of many types known from the Chalk, though rarely found complete.

  • Chalk Bivalve: <i>Inoceramus lamarki</i>, Upper Chalk, Brighton.

    Chalk Bivalve: Inoceramus lamarki, Upper Chalk, Brighton.

    These bivalve shellfish are common in the Chalk but are nearly always broken into small pieces. This is a rare almost complete example.

  • Chalk Bivalve: <i>Inoceramus lamarki</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Brighton.

    Chalk Bivalve: Inoceramus lamarki (detail), Upper Chalk, Brighton.

    These bivalve shellfish are common in the Chalk but are nearly always broken into small pieces. This is a rare almost complete example.

  • Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i>, Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    Chalk Crinoid: Isocrinus granosus, Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    One of the best specimens known of a Chalk crinoid – a group also called sea-lilies. Imagine an upside down starfish perched on a tall stalk for an understanding of these strange creatures.

  • Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    Chalk Crinoid: Isocrinus granosus (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    One of the best specimens known of a Chalk crinoid – a group also called sea-lilies. Imagine an upside down starfish perched on a tall stalk for an understanding of these strange creatures.

  • Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    Chalk Crinoid: Isocrinus granosus (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    One of the best specimens known of a Chalk crinoid – a group also called sea-lilies. Imagine an upside down starfish perched on a tall stalk for an understanding of these strange creatures.

  • Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    Chalk Crinoid: Isocrinus granosus (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.

    One of the best specimens known of a Chalk crinoid – a group also called sea-lilies. Imagine an upside down starfish perched on a tall stalk for an understanding of these strange creatures.

  • Chalk Ptychodus: <i>Ptychodus</i> sp., Upper Chalk, Sussex.

    Chalk Ptychodus: Ptychodus sp., Upper Chalk, Sussex.

    These are fish teeth, originally from a shark-like ray which would have used a battery of such teeth for crushing molluscs and crustaceans.

  • Chalk Ptychodus: <i>Ptychodus</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Sussex.

    Chalk Ptychodus: Ptychodus sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Sussex.

    These are fish teeth, originally from a shark-like ray which would have used a battery of such teeth for crushing molluscs and crustaceans.

  • Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i>, Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    Chalk Fish: Hoplopteryx lewesiensis, Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    This fish lived in the Chalk Sea 85 million years ago and was about 27cm long when fully grown.

  • Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    Chalk Fish: Hoplopteryx lewesiensis (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    This fish lived in the Chalk Sea 85 million years ago and was about 27cm long when fully grown.

  • Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    Chalk Fish: Hoplopteryx lewesiensis (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.

    This fish lived in the Chalk Sea 85 million years ago and was about 27cm long when fully grown.

  • Chalk Mosasaur jaw: <i>Mosasurus gracilis</i>, Offham nr. Lewes.

    Chalk Mosasaur jaw: Mosasurus gracilis, Offham nr. Lewes.

    This is part of a jaw of a marine reptile, not unlike a large monitor lizard. It would have breathed air and been a predator on fish.

  • Chalk Mosasaur jaw: <i>Mosasurus gracilis</i> (detail), Offham nr. Lewes.

    Chalk Mosasaur jaw: Mosasurus gracilis (detail), Offham nr. Lewes.

    This is part of a jaw of a marine reptile, not unlike a large monitor lizard. It would have breathed air and been a predator on fish.

  • <i>Spondylus</i>

    Spondylus

    Spondylus spinosus was a common bivalve mollusc that lived in the Chalk Sea. It had spines which helped deter predators and supported it on soft sediments.

  • <i>Spondylus</i> (detail)

    Spondylus (detail)

    Spondylus spinosus was a common bivalve mollusc that lived in the Chalk Sea. It had spines which helped deter predators and supported it on soft sediments.

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  1. <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> Upper Chalk, East Sussex.
  2. <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.
  3. <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.
  4. <i>Ctenothrissa radians</i> (detail) Upper Chalk, East Sussex.
  5. Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  6. Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  7. Chalk Lobster: <i>Palaeastacus dixoni</i> (detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  8. Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  9. Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  10. Chalk Lobster: <i>Enoploclytia leachii</i> (Pincers - detail) Lower Chalk, Clayton, East Sussex.
  11. Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp., Upper Chalk, Kent.
  12. Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.
  13. Chalk Starfish: <i>Metopaster</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Kent.
  14. Chalk Bivalve: <i>Inoceramus lamarki</i>, Upper Chalk, Brighton.
  15. Chalk Bivalve: <i>Inoceramus lamarki</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Brighton.
  16. Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i>, Middle Chalk, Lewes.
  17. Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.
  18. Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.
  19. Chalk Crinoid: <i>Isocrinus granosus</i> (detail), Middle Chalk, Lewes.
  20. Chalk Ptychodus: <i>Ptychodus</i> sp., Upper Chalk, Sussex.
  21. Chalk Ptychodus: <i>Ptychodus</i> sp. (detail), Upper Chalk, Sussex.
  22. Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i>, Upper Chalk, Southerham.
  23. Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.
  24. Chalk Fish: <i>Hoplopteryx lewesiensis</i> (detail), Upper Chalk, Southerham.
  25. Chalk Mosasaur jaw: <i>Mosasurus gracilis</i>, Offham nr. Lewes.
  26. Chalk Mosasaur jaw: <i>Mosasurus gracilis</i> (detail), Offham nr. Lewes.
  27. <i>Spondylus</i>
  28. <i>Spondylus</i> (detail)

 

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