Treasures of The Booth Museum - Lower Cretaceous

The Hidden Treasures of Sussex Museums » Booth_3 Museaum - Lower Cretaceous

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  • Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from above)

    Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from above)

    This splendid skull is from about 140 million years ago and belonged to an early crocodile that lived in Sussex together with dinosaurs like Iguanodon. Unfortunately its lower jaw and most teeth are missing.

  • Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from below)

    Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from below)

    This splendid skull is from about 140 million years ago and belonged to an early crocodile that lived in Sussex together with dinosaurs like Iguanodon. Unfortunately its lower jaw and most teeth are missing.

  • Auroch Skull (top view)

    Auroch Skull (top view)

     

  • Auroch Skull (underside view)

    Auroch Skull (underside view)

     

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> toe

    Iguanodon toe

    Iguanodon is the dinosaur most famously connected with Sussex since it was here where its teeth were first found in 1822 by Gideon Mantell, the Lewes doctor. This toe - or metatarsal is the fourth bone up from the claw bone.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> toe (detail)

    Iguanodon toe (detail)

    Iguanodon is the dinosaur most famously connected with Sussex since it was here where its teeth were first found in 1822 by Gideon Mantell, the Lewes doctor. This toe - or metatarsal is the fourth bone up from the claw bone.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> footprint cast

    Iguanodon footprint cast

    This is a natural cast of an Iguanodon footprint from the beach at Bexhill. They are occasionally uncovered at low tides.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> femur

    Iguanodon femur

    Part of the thigh bone of an Iguanodon showing just how massive its legs were.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> femur (end view)

    Iguanodon femur (end view)

    Part of the thigh bone of an Iguanodon showing just how massive its legs were.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> vertebra

    Iguanodon vertebra

    A bone from the tail of a young dinosaur - probably Iguanodon.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> vertebra

    Iguanodon vertebra

    A bone from the tail of a young dinosaur - probably Iguanodon.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> small toe

    Iguanodon small toe

    A toe from a young dinosaur.

  • <i>Iguanodon</i> pubis

    Iguanodon pubis

    When this was first found in the early 19th century no-one was sure what bone it was. First identified as a shoulder blade it turned out to be part of the pelvis of a young Iguanodon.

  • Crocodile snout

    Crocodile snout

    This snout preserves some of the teeth which the crocodile would have used to catch the large fish which swam in the rivers and lakes 140 million years ago.

  • Crocodile snout (lower)

    Crocodile snout (lower)

    This snout preserves some of the teeth which the crocodile would have used to catch the large fish which swam in the rivers and lakes 140 million years ago.

  • Crocodile snout (detail)

    Crocodile snout (detail)

    This snout preserves some of the teeth which the crocodile would have used to catch the large fish which swam in the rivers and lakes 140 million years ago.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Odonata

    Insects: Odonata

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Orthoptera

    Insects: Orthoptera

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Orthoptera

    Insects: Orthoptera

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Diptera wing

    Insects: Diptera wing

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Diptera wing close-up

    Insects: Diptera wing close-up

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

  • Insects: Diptera wing close-up

    Insects: Diptera wing close-up

    The hot moist conditions of the monsoonal Weald, 140 million years ago would have suited insects of all kinds. If you know where to look insect fossils are quite common in rocks of Sussex and Surrey and include dragonflies, midges, ants, daddy long legs, wasps and cockroaches.

»
  1. Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from above)
  2. Crocodile skull from Cuckfield. (from below)
  3. Auroch Skull (top view)
  4. Auroch Skull (underside view)
  5. <i>Iguanodon</i> toe
  6. <i>Iguanodon</i> toe (detail)
  7. <i>Iguanodon</i> footprint cast
  8. <i>Iguanodon</i> femur
  9. <i>Iguanodon</i> femur (end view)
  10. <i>Iguanodon</i> vertebra
  11. <i>Iguanodon</i> vertebra
  12. <i>Iguanodon</i> small toe
  13. <i>Iguanodon</i> pubis
  14. Crocodile snout
  15. Crocodile snout (lower)
  16. Crocodile snout (detail)
  17. Insects: Odonata
  18. Insects: Odonata
  19. Insects: Odonata
  20. Insects: Odonata
  21. Insects: Odonata
  22. Insects: Odonata
  23. Insects: Odonata
  24. Insects: Orthoptera
  25. Insects: Orthoptera
  26. Insects: Diptera wing
  27. Insects: Diptera wing close-up
  28. Insects: Diptera wing close-up

 

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